joi, 31 martie 2016

2016 results

 


At the

Fifth Edition of The Haiku Contest
SHARPENING THE GREEN PENCIL 2016

organized by Romanian Kukai Group have participated

250 participants from 5 continents and 45 countries.
as follows:

AFRICA:
Ghana (2), Nigeria (1), South Africa (1), Tunisia (1);

ASIA:
Bangladesh (4), India (14), Indonesia (1), Israel (2), Japan (1), Malaysia (3), Nepal (1), Pakistan (1), Philippines (4), Singapore (1), Sri Lanka (1), Thailanda (1), Turkey (1);

AUSTRALIA:
Australia (19), New Zealand (14);

EUROPE:
Belgium (2), Bosnia and Herzegovina (3), Bulgaria (6), Croatia (26),
Cyprus (1), Finland (1), France (2), Germany (11), Italy (2), Lithuania (3), Moldavia (1), Montenegro (3), Netherlands (1), Poland (13), Portugal (1), Romania (23), Russia (1), Serbia (17), Slovenia (4), Spain (4), Sweden (1), Switzerland (3), Ukraine (1), United Kingdom (10);

NORTH AMERICA:
Canada (7), United States of America (29);


The organizers would like to express their gratitude to the participants for such a large interest
and invite everyone to participate in the fourth edition,
which will start in February 2016.


Corneliu Traian ATANASIU, President of the Jury
Cezar Florin CIOBÎCĂ, Member of the Jury
Dan DOMAN, Member of the Jury
Eduard ŢARĂ, Secretary,
Cristina Oprea,
Ana Drobot

Congratulations to the winners and commended haiku poets.




WINNERS



First Prize



fogbound...
singing rhymes to the baby
in my womb

Archana Kapoor NAGPAL
Bangalore, INDIA

Even since the judging began, I was attracted by the beauty of this poem and I was convinced that it would be among the winning poems. The fog is a seasonal element that gives the poem a special aura. A symbol of shapelessness, of undetermined material space, the fog comprises three elements: air, water, and earth. Alternatively, the fog means genesis, i.e. creativity,  ideas and assumptions.

The first part of the poem introduces us into the season, into a foggy, oppressive atmosphere. The pregnant woman, on her way home or to work, who knows, gets caught in the toils of fog; the word bound makes us perceive the fog like a hallucinogenic trap, a maze that inoculates in this woman feelings of fear and anguish. What makes her not to fall into despair, to remain calm, is the song that the woman keeps humming while crossing the mist that upholsters the space, wrapping around it like a huge shroud.

         We discover that the song that somehow alleviates the atmosphere  is not addressed to a child that walks along with his/her mother, but to baby not yet born. We can speculate that this unborn baby, maybe scared by its mom’s fears, who is perhaps feeling anxious, starts kicking energetically, eager to come earlier to life. Getting closer to each other through the song, the mother and the baby face the hostile fog together. A very simple and eloquent haiku sublimating the idea of maternity, which reminds me of a beautiful proverb: “God could not be there for us literally everywhere and at all times, and therefore he created the mothers.”  Embraced by the mystery of both natural and human world, this touching haiku ultimately speaks about hope and resilience.

comment and translation by Cezar Florin CIOBÎCĂ





Second Prize



cutting reeds
piece by piece
the backwater turns blue

Marta CHOCILOWSKA
Warsaw, POLAND

The poem does not need kireji since it frames a meaningful story whose meaning skids by itself, unexpectedly, from a practical matter to a symbolical, almost exemplary, result. The characteristic charm and tension of the poem consists in a contextual ellipsis whose hint is only given with its last word. The hard work (done by just one individual or perhaps by us all) turns out to be a kind of escape, release, patient purification of the water which reflects the blue sky. Piece by piece, as a result of our labour, the sky changes the backwater’s colour.


comment by Corneliu Traian Atanasiu
translation by Ana DROBOT





Third Prize



stone Buddha –
I learn to forgive
a mosquito

Marek KOZUBEK
Bangkok, THAILAND

Perhaps it is about an imposing statue or, who knows, a small one that, even if not made of stone, is sold as an amulet of indifference. In both cases, the stone symbolizes the stillness, the lack of movement, an impassive attitude, which is paradoxically, serene and empathic. It is the attitude which, without words, contaminates the viewer or the one who hides it piously in his bosom, like a talisman always there with its bearer. Aspiring to be the Buddha himself. An immutable, though barely sketched, smile. Made of stone without crushing anything. Eternally lenient with everything that is alive and sensitive. Even if it's awfully annoying.

comment by Corneliu Traian Atanasiu
translation by Ana DROBOT




COMMENDATIONS


dad's life
the bite marks
on his pipe

Stephanie Visaya BOSE
Honolulu, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA



new buds next to the crosses –
the cemetery comes back
to life again


Petru Ioan GÂRDA
Cluj Napoca, ROMANIA

wood silence ...
each thought unstrings
to a birdsong

Rajandeep GARG
Sangrur, INDIA



spring cleaning
I take out of the shoe box
my childhood

Jacek MARGOLAK
Kielce, POLAND

spring rain
an old letter
unfolded again

Anna MARIS
Övraby, SWEDEN




a wheelchair –
carefully avoiding
the lines of the hopscotch

Dan NOREA
Constanţa, ROMANIA

some seeds
in his pockets...
the refugee

Rita ODEH
Haifa, ISRAEL



summer mountain lake –
she's taking her swimsuit off
and my doubts away

Minh Triêt PHAM
Paris, FRANCE

dry stone wall
a young lizard gathers
the sunrays

Vladimir ŠUK
Oroslavje, CROATIA



playing and falling
the children
the snow

Michael Dylan WELCH
Sammamish, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


Selected poems


Magdalena BANASZKIEWICZ, Krosno Odrzańskie, POLAND

Cherese COBB, Maryville, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Nadin GHILESCHI, Botoşani, ROMANIA

Shrikaanth KRISHNAMURTHY, Birmingham, THE UNITED KINGDOM

Ajaya MAHALA, Pune, INDIA

Dragan J. RISTIĆ, Niš, SERBIA

Ernesto P. SANTIAGO, Solano, PHILIPPINES

Ken SAWITRI, Blora, INDONESIA

Silva TRSTENJAK, Strigova, CROATIA

Agnieszka ŻĄDŁO, Zielonka, POLAND



miercuri, 14 octombrie 2015

About Contest



The Haiku Contest
SHARPENING THE GREEN PENCIL
organized by the Romanian Kukai Group


The ROMANIAN KUKAI MONTHLY CONTEST has celebrated 5 years of online activity on April 1st, 2012. The contest is addressed to those who can write in Romanian, only. It has been and still is an excellent way to promote haiku for those who can speak Romanian. Furthermore, the haiku online contest has become a genuine school where a new generation of authors have been promoted.

The majority of the subscribers to our contest in Romanian have been participating to international contests in English and they gain many excelent results. We agree that the time has come to offer them a chance to confront the worldwide writers in a contest organized by us. So, the experience, which has been gained in these years, determined us to initiate a contest in English, language which is the mostly used by the haiku writers, currently.

SHARPENING THE GREEN PENCIL is a celebrating contest, but we hope and we wish that it will become a yearly event. A contest which - like other recognized contests - comes to stimulate the creativity of the authors and the quality of their poems, and to represent a way of mutual understanding and of enriching everyone’s experience.

The contest's name is inspired by one of the well known lyrics of Elena Manta Ciubotariu's haiku, awarded in 1995 at one of the international contests organized in USA


spring –
the child is sharpening
the green pencil

vineri, 20 martie 2015

2015 Results

 


At the

Fourth Edition of The Haiku Contest
SHARPENING THE GREEN PENCIL 2015

organized by Romanian Kukai Group have participated

286 participants from 6 continents and 40 countries.
as follows:

AFRICA:
Tunisia (1);

ASIA:
India (13), Indonesia (1), Iran (1), Israel (2), Japan (1), Philippines (5), Yemen (1);

AUSTRALIA:
Australia (15), New Zealand (11);

EUROPE:
Austria (1), Belarus (1), Belgium (1), Bosnia and Herzegovina (4), Bulgaria (21), Croatia (30), Denmark (1), France (4), Germany (19), Hungary (1), Italy (4), Lithuania (7), Macedonia (1), Montenegro (3), Netherlands (2), Poland (18), Portugal (2), Romania (31), Russia (4), Serbia (14), Slovenia (4), Spain (5), Switzerland (2), Ukraine (2), United Kingdom (5);

NORTH AMERICA:
Canada (6), United States of America (38);

SOUTH AMERICA:
Argentia (2), Brazil (1), Colombia (1).


The organizers would like to express their gratitude to the participants for such a large interest
and invite everyone to participate in the fourth edition,
which will start in February 2016.


Corneliu Traian ATANASIU, President of the Jury
Cezar Florin CIOBÎCĂ, Member of the Jury
Dan DOMAN, Member of the Jury
Eduard ŢARĂ, Secretary

Congratulations to the winners and commended haiku poets.




WINNERS



First Prize



quiet rain...
a robin slips through
my chemo fog

Roberta BEARY
Bethesda, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The first part of the poem – quiet rain – sets up the atmosphere of an almost resigned sadness. Only in the final words we learn that both the rain and the silence have a pendant in the dizziness caused both by the illness and by the treatment. And we are not sure anymore if the fog is associated to the rain or to the chemotherapy. Or maybe it links these two together, making them as one.

          And yet, sliding imperceptibly, a bird sneaks through this adverse matter, bringing news, a memory, a sparkle of life and of hope? Could it be a sign of relief, a farewell, a reconciliation?

comment by Corneliu Traian ATANASIU
translation by Liliana NEGOI





Second Prize



whisper of spring –
snowdrops besieging
a cartridge case

Petru-Ioan GÂRDA
Cluj-Napoca, ROMANIA

The obvious contrast between the spontaneous vernal burst of snowdrops and the cartridge, remnant of some bellicose intentions, is enough to trigger the appetite for parable of the reader. Could snowdrops be a squadron of restoring or maintaining the peace? Have they isolated the cartridge case in order to secure the place from contamination? Or maybe they invaded it with playful intentions, inviting it at some ingenuous game?

          The poem, as it befits a haiku, doesn’t decide upon this thing, but the whisper of spring, tempts our thought with the peace and quiet of the forest. The apparition of snowdrops is just an innocent reproof against hunters.


comment by Corneliu Traian Atanasiu
translation by Liliana NEGOI





Third Prize



stargazing...
the warmth of the sun
still in her hair

Chase GAGNON
Detroit, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

          Two images that can be paired in different combinations. We can think about a couple who, after spending a long time under the summer sun, enjoys also the appearance of stars. We can shift the events, the stars being watched during another season, and the sun’s warmth being only a reflex of her golden hair, just like the glow of sun during summer. It is possible also that only he is watching the stars, and the sun’s warmth, still caught in her hair, could be just a memory risen right there from the darkness in which she vanished long ago.

          However, in both situations the chillness of the stars finds a counterweight in the warmth of the sun. Or maybe just the hair, thus become an eternal substitute of the sun?

comment by Corneliu Traian ATANASIU
translation by Liliana NEGOI




COMMENDATIONS


bent tree...
the last apple plunging into
the fountain's abyss


Gabriel ALEXE
Botoşani, ROMANIA




all the shadows
join together at evening –
I stay alone


Francesco DE SABATA
Pescantina, ITALY


spiderlings
hitch a ride on thistledown –
new beginnings


Marilyn HUMBERT
Sydney, AUSTRALIA




The first day of school –
her legs waving on a bench
far from the floor


Nina KOVAČIĆ
Zagreb, CROATIA


war
soldiers on both sides of
grass


Andrius LUNECKAS
Vilnius, LITHUANIA




scorching heat
dragonfly's eyes reflect
dry pebbles


Boris NAZANSKY
Zagreb, CROATIA


mist rising –
the castle ruins
reconstituted


Minh-Triêt PHAM
Paris, FRANCE




trench lines
in the bramble
a soldier's sigh


Shloka SHANKAR
Bangalore, INDIA


out to pasture
only the wind upon
her bent back


Debbie STRANGE
Winnipeg, CANADA




how harmlessly
they rustle in the breeze,
the poppy capsules


Božena ZERNEC
Krapina, CROATIA